9/26/09

Olympic Athletes Smoke Camels! (1935)


From the July 21, 1935 San Antonio Light (San Antonio, TX). Notice that this ran in the comics section of the paper...


9/20/09

Free Movie Film Library (1932)

This article appeared in the February 14, 1932 San Antonio Express (San Antonio, TX).

7/4/09

How Will Christopher Columbus Be Seen In 2362 A.D.? (1927)

From the July 4, 1927 Fresno Bee (Fresno, CA):
It is to wonder what the people of the year 23;62 A.D. will make of the exploits of Byrd over the North Pole and Lindbergh over the Atlantic.

The year 2362 is 435 years hence: 435 years before 1927 Christopher Columbus was making his voyage and getting his name into history. Of Columbus' mysterious past there has been much speculation. Obscure as have been his antecedents, his deed remained glorious until now, when a French biographer, Marius Andre, comes forward with the charge that Columbus was no navigator, that he was no sailor, no captain, no hero, no conquistador -- nothing but a fraud, a profiteer, a slave dealer, a liar of no mean ability, a discoverer whose major achievements were in his imagination.

All this finding is in style with the newer trends of historical research -- to tear down any glamour that any man has acquired through the centuries. Defenders of Columbus will of course rush forward to clean the smudge from the shield of their idol, but it is really unnecessary. The accomplishment of the man, which can not be effaced by any besmirching of character, make his position secure.

See also:

7/2/09

Happy Birthday America? (1976)


Since I was just a twinkle in my father's eye in 1976 (that's creepy-speak for "not born yet") I'm always amazed when I come across bizarre "down-but-not-out" advertisements celebrating the U.S. Bicentennial.

This ad for the Grand Prairie State Bank appeared in the July 4, 1976 Grand Prairie Daily News (Grand Prairie, TX). Are there any comparable ads being put out today, given the tough economic times we face?

See also:

6/29/09

Dial 911 For Help! (1968)


Remember the days before 911? Neither do I.

This edition of the long-running strip Our New Age by Athelstan Spilhaus ran in the June 16, 1968 Progress-Index (Petersburg, VA)

6/27/09

You're Never Going to Get Married Without Colgate (1958)

Advertisement from the June 15, 1958 Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY)

6/21/09

Because it's not smart to cancel on Mom (1977)


It's like a TiVo that always flashes "12:00."
November 2, 1977 Winnipeg Free Press (Winnipeg, Manitoba)

5/13/09

Ten Golden Rules (1931)


These "ten golden rules" for health and happiness appeared in the Dec 6, 1931 Daily Capital News and Post-Tribune (Jefferson City, MO).

1. Eat slowly.
2. Be Cheerful.
3. Brush Your Teeth Daily.
4. Learn Something Each Day - Do Your Best.
5. Avoid Contagious Diseases.
6. Qeep Clean - Body, Clothes, Mind.
7. Always Cover a Sneeze or Cough.
8. Drink at Least Four Glasses of Water Daily.
9. Sleep Eight Hours in a Well Ventilated Room.
10. Play Hard and Fair.

5/4/09

Boonson[?] quarter[?] [...] (1921)



Apparently this image confuses the Library of Congress as well. The title to this photo is listed as: "Boonson[?] quarter[?] [...]" Can anyone shed some light as to what's happening here? Is it a Bocce photo shoot?

You can download a high quality version of this image at the Library of Congress Prints and Photos website.

5/3/09

Working Wives Change? (1959)


The August 24, 1959 Tri-City Herald (Pasco, WA) ran this gem by Douglass Welch.
A prominent psychologist says that the working wife probably is not as much in love with her husband as her counterpart, the non-working wife. This is because she is not as much dependent upon him for her livelihood. And her workaday tasks require her to think of her boss, her job and her own relationship to the world of business.
The fact is, the working wife is more of a realist and less a romanticist. She has less need of continual reassurances that she is loved. And the woman who earns more than her husband may love him, but in time that love tends to become the kind you lavish on an awfully nice but ineffectual relative.
See also:
For Tighter Marriage, Just Button Your Lip! (1959)

11/15/08

Homestead in Montana (1909)


The December 17, 1909 Le Grand Reporter (Le Grand, IA) ran this ad for land in Montana.
You have, an opportunity to-day to secure a farm In Montana that you will not have in two years from now. You can get 160 acres of free government homestead land for the trifling cost of the filing fees. You can get 320 acres of land free in Northern Montana under the enlarged homestead act. This land is pronounced by Professor Thomas Shaw to be the best In the Northwest. It will grow 30 bushels of Turkey Red Wheat to the acre -- from 60 to 100 bushels of oats. It will grow large crops of barley, rye and flax. It Is rich soil and only needs an intelligent farmer to make It yield enormous crops. You can not get this land two years from now, it will be taken up. You must act quickly -- as filings are being made rapidly. Most of this land lies In Montana, north of the Great Northern Railway and between the eastern boundary and the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Much of it is in the fertile Milk River Valley, where the government is constructing one of the largest Irrigation Projects in the country.

In the Flathead Valley land is cheap.

If interested in exchanging your high priced land or your rented land for free land or low priced land, write for our "New Book on Montana, which gives full information about the conditions, and opportunities for farmers. Write to-day.

6/25/08

Kentucky (1916)


"Driving boy" taking pigs to market. Says he is 14 years old and has been working with pigs for 9 years. Goes to school in Paris, Ky. Horace Harpe, 320 West 8 Street. Location: Winchester [vicinity], Kentucky / Lewis W. Hine.

A higher-resolution download of this 1916 image can be found at the Library of Congress website.

6/19/08

Kansas (1943)


This photograph from March, 1943 was taken in a Santa Fe R.R. locomotive shop in Topeka, Kansas. A higher-resolution download of this image can be found at the Library of Congress website.

See also:
Illinois (1943)

5/19/08

Iowa (1940)


Civil Liberties in War Times
1940 Poster for a lecture by Max Lerner at Roosevelt High, Des Moines, Iowa, showing an armored guantlet clenched in a fist.

A high-resolution image of the poster can be downloaded at the Library of Congress website.

See also:
How Experts Think We'll Live in 2000 A.D. (1950)

5/18/08

My Robot's Birthday Party (1994)

The Robot
I found the robot pieces. I put the pieces together so it looked like a robot. I named him Zachary. The next day it was Zachary's birthday party. One day Zachary snorted because it was his birthday party. Zachary was 18 years old.

First-grader Lisa Stamp wrote this story, which appeared in the March 19, 1994 Daily Register (Oelwein, IA).

See also:
My Robot (1994)
The Robot From Outer Space (1994)
My Robot Gets Lunch (1994)

5/17/08

Indiana (1908)


Jack, A Bright Indianapolis Boy of 13: Was a Messenger at the age of 11. Indiana has no age limit for mes'grs. Aug., 1908. Wit., E. N. Clopper. Location: Indianapolis, Indiana.

You can find a high-resolution version of this image by Lewis Wickes Hine at the Library of Congress website.

See also:
Alabama (1940)
Alaska (1940s)
Arizona (circa 1885)
Arkansas (1935)
California (1943)
Colorado (1859)
Connecticut (1961)
Delaware (1910)
Florida (circa 1910)
Georgia (circa 1940)
Hawaii (1902)
Idaho (1941)
Illinois (1943)

5/15/08

My Robot Gets Lunch (1994)

My Robot Gets Lunch
My robot's name is Kyle. He gets me lunch every day. He fixes my car. When he's done, he finds a new job. He gets a new home. He got a new son. He got four more children.

First-grader Nick Palmer wrote this story, which appeared in the March 19, 1994 Daily Register (Oelwein, IA).

See also:
My Robot (1994)
The Robot From Outer Space (1994)

Illinois (1943)


This photo by Jack Delano was taken in April of 1943. It is titled, "Daniel Anastazia, blacksmith's helper, Rock Island R.R., Blue Island, Ill."

You can find a high-resolution version of the image at the Library of Congress website.

See also:
Alabama (1940)
Alaska (1940s)
Arizona (circa 1885)
Arkansas (1935)
California (1943)
Colorado (1859)
Connecticut (1961)
Delaware (1910)
Florida (circa 1910)
Georgia (circa 1940)
Hawaii (1902)
Idaho (1941)

5/14/08

The Robot from Outer Space (1994)

The Robot from Outer Space
My robot flew down from outer space. My robot found some people to talk with. My robot talked with the president. Then my robot started walking to get something to eat. It was ice cream. When he was done, my robot flew back to outer space because my robot was tired. The end.

Zachary Stocker wrote this story, which appeared in the March 19, 1994 Daily Register (Oelwein, IA).

See also:
My Robot (1994)

My Robot (1994)

The March 19, 1994 Daily Register (Oelwein, IA) published the short stories of local first-grade students. Wings Park teacher, Barb Ehlers, asked her students to write about their robots and received some pretty awesome responses.

Nowhere is there any indication that the aforementioned robots are imaginary, so I will assume that these robots actually exist. I expect this series to be more interesting than the A-Z states experiment.

But no promises.

These stories seem to be crying out for drawings. Feel free to submit any that you are inspired to create: matt[at]paleofuture.com

See also:
The United States (Alabama to Wyoming)
Rosie the Robot (1962)

The Photoscope (1904)


Apparently this photoscope, (a photobooth sans booth), was all the rage at the St. Louis Exposition. The ad above was found in the June 4, 1904 Ogden Standard (Ogden, UT).
The newest novelty in Nickel-in-the-Slot Machines. Takes your photograph, develops and delivers to you in one minute. The only Nickel-in-the-Slot Machine that aside from affording amusement gives permanent value for your money. Always a perfect likeness. Takes but a minute, costs 5 cents. Be sure to try the first one you see.

200 in operation at the St. Louis Exposition.

See also:
A Ballad for the Fair (1964)

5/13/08

Idaho (1941)


This photograph by Russell Lee was taken in 1941 on the main street of Cascade, Idaho. The Cascade Club looks like it's hopping. You can find a higher resolution version of the photo at the Library of Congress website.

See also:
Alabama (1940)
Alaska (1940s)
Arizona (circa 1885)
Arkansas (1935)
California (1943)
Colorado (1859)
Connecticut (1961)
Delaware (1910)
Florida (circa 1910)
Georgia (circa 1940)
Hawaii (1902)

Hawaii (1902)


Melvin Vaniman took this panoramic photo on July 3, 1902 at a Haleiwa Hotel in Honolulu, Hawaii. It can be found at the Library of Congress website and must be viewed in a larger version to be truly appreciated.

See also:
Alabama (1940)
Alaska (1940s)
Arizona (circa 1885)
Arkansas (1935)
California (1943)
Colorado (1859)
Connecticut (1961)
Delaware (1910)
Florida (circa 1910)
Georgia (circa 1940)

5/12/08

Delivered Twins in 20 Minutes, With No Pain! (1895)


Let me get this straight Mrs. Anna Gage; you delivered twins, in 20 minutes, with no pain? I guess there was no Federal Trade Commission to investigate your claims back in 1895. This "Mothers' Friend" was, of course, sold by ALL druggists.

The ad appeared in the July 18, 1895 Cambridge Jeffersonian (Cambridge, OH).

See also:
Anti-Fat (1878)

5/11/08

Spy Pen (1967)


This advertisement for a "Spy Pen" appears to be encouraging less-than-wholesome endeavors. With a money back guarantee, no less! It seems that one might have to order a "Spy Drill" in order for that pen to work properly.

The ad appeared in the October, 1967 issue of the comic book Strange Suspense Stories.

4/30/08

Cheeks Like Pomegranates (1952)


I'm not sure why I was struck by the phrase, "cheeks like pomegranates," but I was. The photo ran in the September 18, 1952 Idaho State Journal (Pocatello, ID).
A Grecian girl with cheeks like pomegranates has come to Idaho State College. Maria Skoulfkaris, center, tells fellow freshmen, Ann Reed of Filer, and LaMar Muir of Idaho Falls, that she has never been kissed but expects to be a threat when they study Greek drama.

2/21/08

A Ballad for the Fair (1964)


The 1964 film A Ballad for the Fair gives a tour of the 1964 New York World's Fair, with a heavy emphasis on communications technology. Produced by Bell System, you are even treated to a taste of the Bell System ride. You can watch the entire film below or just check out the futurism aspects at Paleo-Future.

And did we mention the folk singing? Oh, the folk singing!




The DVD set 1964 World's Fair at Extinct Attractions contains the film.

2/20/08

Georgia (circa 1940)


Georgia oat field? Southern U.S.

Early color photography of the 1940s certainly has a unique quality that is difficult to describe. Such interesting saturation is what seems to be the most striking. You can find out more about this image at the Library of Congress website.

See also:
Alabama (1940)
Alaska (1940s)
Arizona (circa 1885)
Arkansas (1935)
California (1943)
Colorado (1859)
Connecticut (1961)
Delaware (1910)
Florida (circa 1910)

2/10/08

Delaware (1910)


2 newsgirls. Location: Wilmington, Delaware.

You can find out more about this image at the Library of Congress website.

See also:
Alabama (1940)
Alaska (1940s)
Arizona (circa 1885)
Arkansas (1935)
California (1943)
Colorado (1859)
Connecticut (1961)